Tag Archives: books

Book Bucket-list: 10 Books To Read This Summer

Erin Gardner | Editor-in-Chief | eg245916@ohio.edu

Are you bored yet? FANGLE is here to help with 10 book recommendations to keep you busy this summer.

The Female Persuasion – Meg Wolitzer

Shy college freshman, Greer Kadetsky meets Faith Frank, a sixty-three-year-old trailblazer for the women’s movement. Greer is extremely infatuated with her boyfriend, Cory, but when she hears Faith talk about women’s rights, she feels something spark. Wolitzer reminds women and men alike that love isn’t everything. Bring this gem along on a beach day and be reminded that you’re a badass.

The Outsiders – S.E. Hinton

In this timeless novel, Hinton introduces Ponyboy Curtis, a greaser from the north side of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Pony’s brothers and friends depend on each other—they have to. The clash of social class teaches Pony that in the end the Greasers and the Socs aren’t that all different. Published in 1967, this cult classic is the perfect summer read when the summer blues are in full swing.

Sociable – Rebecca Harrington

Elinor Tomlinson, with a degree in journalism, moves to New York and hopes to marry her journalist-turned boyfriend while writing catchy and zingy opinion pieces. Her reality: she nannies for two toddlers and sleeps in an unkempt apartment. After landing a job at Journalism.ly, she learns she effectively writes shareable, relatable content and soon becomes popular. But with internet fame come its flames. This relevant read is a personal favorite of FANGLE.

Text Me When You Get Home – Kayleen Schaefer

Every woman knows this phrase—text me when you get home, get home safe, call me if you need me, love you. Schaefer, through interviews with historians, celebrities, authors and producers, reconstructs how we as society view friendships. Take this nugget for the book club with your girls (and guys).

Ohio – Stephen Markley

Although Markley’s novel is set to be released in August, the murder mystery is one to be watching. In a small Ohio town where there is only “war, recession, political gridlock, racial hostility, and a simmering fear of environmental calamity…where foreclosures, Walmarts, and opiates riddle the land, death rates for rural whites have skyrocketed, fueled by suicide, addiction and a rampant sense of marginalization and disillusionment,” the novel is scarily applicable. Four classmates, Bill Ashcraft, Stacey Moore, Dan Eaton and Tina Ross, reunite in the podunk town, each on an undertaking. Read this page-turner on a rainy day with a iced coffee in tow.

The Witch Doesn’t Burn in this One //and// The Princess Saves Herself in this One– Amanda Lovelace

Lovelace’s poems are packed full of raw emotion and feminine power. She makes a point of creating a list of trigger warning: child abuse, intimate partner abuse, sexual assault, eating disorders, trauma, death, murder, violence, fire, menstruation, transphobia & more. “remember

to practice self-care before, during, & after reading,” she writes. These poems are perfect reading material for practical self-care—you know shit that is actually helpful like taking medication and sleeping instead of face masks and guacamole dates.

Tangerine – Christine Mangan

Alice Shipley is startled and confused when she sees her ex-best friend from college, Lucy Mason. Soon after Lucky tries to pick where things left odd, Alice feels smothered by Lucy. Alice’s husband goes missing and shit hits the fan. If you’re feeling saucy, give this a read on a pool day.

Feel Free – Zadie Smith

The collection of essays is organized into five sections—In the World, In the Audience, In the Gallery, On the Bookshelf, and Feel Free. Smith tackles questions like what is the social network, why do we love libraries and what will we tell our granddaughters about our collective failure to address global warming? This think piece is the perfect read in a coffeeshop on a breezy day.

On the Road – Jack Kerouac

Writer, Sal Paradise joins Dean Moriarty, a recluse and rebel, on a road trip from New York to San Francisco to Mexico. With no real plot, the duo experiences America in its raw form. Coming from the beatnik era, Kerouac’s novel has very little punctuation and sentence structure, which could be symbolic of the chaotic and messy way of everyday life. Give this one a read when your room seems too small and your town seems too suburban.