Category Archives: FEATURED

Ohio University’s Greek Life Response to Sexual Assault

Rachel Mark | | rm023716@ohio.edu

When I first stepped foot on campus for my second year at Ohio University, I never would have imagined that my email would be flooded with warnings from the Ohio University Police Department about multiple rapes and even a kidnapping. Within a small span of two weeks, four rapes were already reported. I really tried to not think about the assaults that have occurred but have gone unreported and unnoted.

The streets that I used to feel safe on suddenly turned eerie and sinister. I found myself constantly looking around when I had to walk home alone from Baker one night. Every car that passed had me jumping, wondering if I would be thrown inside, and every male that walked behind me on the sidewalk made me nervous and ready to run in a moment’s notice. I hated feeling completely terrified every time I had to walk somewhere at night, and it hurt knowing thousands of other women on campus were feeling the same exact way.

Since some students at Ohio University still cannot grasp the basic concept of consent, I felt that there needed to be a crash course for those students still struggling with the very complicated phrase of “no.”

How To Understand Consent Like A Human Being

1. If someone tells you “no,” don’t have sex with that person, and don’t touch that person.
2. If someone tells you “I don’t know,” you’re making them uncomfortable, and this is not an opportunity to practice your persuasion skills.
3. “I guess” is still not a solid “yes.”
4. If the person gives no response, the answer is no. Silence does not equal yes.
5. The person can revoke their decision at any time! Consent is not a legal binding contract. Anyone is allowed to change their mind and back out.
6. Consent equals a clear, enthusiastic yes.
7. If the person is slurring his or her words and is incapable to stand, they are in no way able to make a thoughtful decision on consent.
8. Giving a person more alcohol in order to get them to say “yes” is not consent.

The most important thing people can remember to do is to not be a bystander. Make sure your friends are safe and not walking around alone. If you see a person at a party that is clearly not okay, make sure they get home safe with the right people. If one of your friends is not taking no for an answer, call them out on their inappropriate actions.

Overall, I’m glad I’m part of a community that takes assaults seriously. Our little town has put in effort to stop assaults from the giant GroupMe made to make sure people get home safe, to the banners that sororities and fraternities have hung outside their houses and even to local businesses, such as Lotsa Pizza, which offers a safe place for students to go when they feel in danger. As you can tell, our students of Ohio University have been working hard to offer aid and protection to our fellow Bobcats.

Photo by: Rachel Mark

Photo by: Rachel Mark

Ending It is Not the End: World Suicide Prevention Day

Jacob Durbin | Staff Writer | jd250217@ohio.edu

September 10, 2018 is World Suicide Prevention Day. In this day and age, suicide and mental health are prevalent topics in our society. Suicide rates have increased over the last decade. For those who struggle with suicidal thoughts, there are resources available to them at Ohio University. For their friends and loved ones, there are numerous ways to reach out and offer help.
We are a family here at FANGLE. We understand how difficult living with a mental illness can be. If you think you or someone you know, is depressed or suicidal, please reach out. You are not alone.
Resources:
-Campus Care. Hudson Health Center, 1st Floor. 740-592-7100
-Collegiate Recovery Community. 321 Baker University Center. 740-593-4749
-Community Standards and Student Responsibility. 349 Baker University Center. 740-593-2629
-Dean of Students Office. 345 Baker University Center. 740-593-1800
-Employee Assistance Program/Impact Solutions. 1-800-277-6007 (24/7). 740-593-1636 (Human Resources)
-International Student and Faculty Services. Walter International Education Center. 740-593-4330
-LGBT Center. 354 Baker University Center. 740-593-0239
-Multicultural Programs and Multicultural Center. 205 Baker University Center. 740-593-4027
-Office for Diversity and Inclusion. 300 Cutler Hall. 740-593-2431
-Ombudsman Office. 501 Baker. 740-593-2627. Fax: 740-593-0675
-OU Police Department. 135 Scott Quadrangle. 911 or 740-593-1911
-Psychology and Social Work Clinic (PSWC). 002 Porter Hall. 740-593-0902
-Residential Housing. 060 Chubb Hall. 740-593-4090
-Student Accessibility Services. 348 Baker University Center. 740-593-2620
-Student Review and Consultation Committee. 740-593-1800
-Survivor Advocacy Program. McKee House, 44 University Terrace. 24/7 Crisis Line: 740-597-SAFE (7233)
-Women’s Center. 403 Baker University Center. 740-593-9625
Statistics:
-The Ohio State University reported that suicide is one of the leading causes of death among college students.
-According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, there are an average of 123 suicides per day.
-Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death.
-Firearms accounted for 51% of all suicides in 2016.
-In Ohio alone, on average, one person dies by suicide every five hours. Suicide is the 11th leading cause of death; it’s the second leading cause of death for ages 15-34, the fourth leading for ages 35-44, the fifth leading for ages 45-54, the eighth leading for ages 55-64 and the seventeenth leading for ages 65 & older.

TV Dating Versus Real-Life Dating: 5 Lessons to Learn

Samantha Dawn | Freelance blogger
If you get all of your dating advice from reality shows, then chances are you’ll be ill prepared for the real dating world. It can be tough out there as made evident by FANGLE’s survey on several students’ worst dating experiences. The real picture is far from airbrushed couples in magazines and on TV, even if it’s touted as reality programming. FANGLE is here to clear the air with five lessons that years of The Bachelor, Love Island, Beauty and the Geek and all other romance-themed reality shows have taught us.

On love at first sight
If you haven’t caught on yet, several factors of reality TV are manipulated for a certain outcome. Including casting. Producers predetermine a pool of contestants where personalities and compatibilities are already known off screen. Contrary to what the screen says, falling in love at first sight is rare. Word of advice–don’t pass on the chance of getting to know someone just because they didn’t elicit special feelings upon first glance.

On physical appearances
It wasn’t much of a surprise when former Bachelor Sean Lowe divulged that contestants were asked to change their look for the show. Being a form of escapism, reality shows usually highlight beautiful people with enviable lives. However, this creates unrealistic expectations. Physical attraction may be important, but deciding to be in a relationship with someone shouldn’t be based on looks alone. Other traits such as intelligence, humor, and kindness may be more appealing in the long run.

On relationship ideals
Television has a way of setting standards that are impossible to reach especially when it comes to love and romance. This year’s winners of the british reality show Love Island are the perfect example of this. Ladbrokes reported that Dani Dyer and Jack Fincham were fan favorites and even walked away with the prize. It was a match made in reality TV heaven. Despite their palpable chemistry on air, Fincham admitted that their first time together did not exactly set off fireworks. Not everything about dating is as seen on TV. Not all dates revolve around a helicopter ride overlooking the mountains. Avoid disaster by keeping communication lines with your partner open especially when it comes to your needs.

On casual dating
Even though dating shows can put casual dating in a negative light, there’s really nothing shameful about it. It may even be healthy to keep options open. Arie Luyendyk Jr., of The Bachelor, took back his proposal to Becca Kufrin to instead propose to Lauren Burnham. That may have been brutal, but it’s better than forcing a marriage he didn’t want. It also speaks about the time frame of most dating shows— it’s hard to decide on marrying a person after only a few months! So by all means, date around. Safely of course.

On happy endings
At the risk of sounding cynical, a happily ever is fairy tales material, not exactly real life. It is everyone’s hope of meeting their forever person. But just look at Pop Sugar’s list of former contestants of The Bachelor if you want proof that happy endings are more fiction than fact. Many of the engagements fall off after a few months and only a few are made to last. (Sean Lowe and Catherine Giudici, are in fact one of the lucky few who have managed to make it stick.)

Before you put yourself out there, remember that not everything you see on screen will happen in real life. There’s nothing wrong about holding out hope as long as you can keep a realistic attitude about love.

A Love Letter to Social Media

Jamie Clarkson | Social Media Manager | jc063415@ohio.edu

I love social media. Ever since the days that I used the built-in camera on Instagram, I have cherished the feeling of being connected to the world. It was nice to know that I was anything but isolated in my little corner of the universe.

My love of social media has recently become sentimental. Beginning in June of 2018, I took over the position of social media manager for FANGLE Magazine.

Before, I never thought that these apps on my phone could one day become a career. When I realized I could have a future on these platforms without being photogenic and mildly interesting, I was hooked. I was never influencer material, anyway.

Now, Twitter polls, Facebook shares, and page views look very different. Not to say that memes have lost their luster, I still spend my free time laughing at childhood photos of Cardi B. If anything, these inside jokes mean so much more. I now appreciate the strategy it takes to go viral. Or, maybe the lack of strategy. Sheer dumb luck is admirable, too.

Where I find wonderful things online, I also find my pet peeves. The standout being the resurgence of the “RT in 5 seconds or else” trend. While I try to formulate how I can get more engagement for FANGLE and being happy with a dozen clicks, I am watching strangers on Twitter share photos of spiders and instantly getting thousands of retweets. Sheer dumb luck may be admirable, but, it is also endlessly frustrating.

We all love social media for the same reason we hate it: things explode for no reason. Why was In My Feelings by Drake the song that everyone decided to dance to outside of the car? Who knows, but who cares? That is why we loved it.

The summer of 2018 made me recognize all the reasons I loved social media in the first place.

When Instagram released the “Ask Me a Question” feature for their stories, I felt like I was drowning in Q&A’s. However, as I sit back and watch the popularity, I realize this is the type of light-hearted communication that made me love the platform initially.

With the institution of 280-character tweets, I see that Twitter is trying to make their platform more user-friendly and conversation-driven. As users, we now have more freedom to share fully formed thoughts without being cut short. We say goodbye to the 140-character limit, but we watch trial-and-error work in our favor.

I spent a fair amount of time this summer on social media. I was constantly wrapped up in strategy and worrying about what was good or bad. I was nervous that this work would turn me away from something I always felt a connection to. In the end, it just made it that much more special.

Social media—I love you.

How to Prepare For The Upcoming School Year

Haylee Followell | Associate Editor | hf211816@ohio.edu

Although it’s still summer and bobcats still have another month before move in day, you might feel frazzled with the growing to-do list before school. It’s never too early to get organized, ESPECIALLY when it comes to the start of the school year. FANGLE is here to help with 5 things to check on before move in day!

1. Check account balance on your “My Ohio Student Center”

Have you looked at how much your fall semester total is going to be? Have you looked to make sure you wanted to be apart of the Ohio University legal service? Take out student loans if needed and make sure you know how your fall semester is being paid for. Nothing is more stressful than waiting until the last minute to figure out loans; give yourself at least two weeks to apply for a loan, depending on the company it could take longer.

2. Talk to your roommates–who’s bringing what?

Dorm decorating is one of my favorite parts of move-in, but accidentally having two tvs and three rugs can make it a hassle. If you know who your roomates for the year are going to be, start a group chat and discuss what everyone is bringing. If you haven’t met your roommates, this is a perfect icebreaker! Try to message your roommate on Facebook, Instagram or email. It is also super helpful to make a checklist of the items you already have and items you still need to get.

3. Finalize & mark important events- meal plans, classes, etc.

It is important to make sure your desired meal plan, roommates, and classes are finalized before arriving to school. Classes are more flexible to change during the start of school, but it becomes harder to change after August 20. Is this your graduating year? Have you decided to graduate early? If so, know the dates on which you need to apply to graduate. Figure out important dates before the start of school. If you’re planning to study abroad, know the dates application and payments are due as well. Have you checked if there was any summer homework? Nothing is worse than showing up to the first day of class not prepared.

4. Tie up loose ends at home

Is there a summer job you need to put your two weeks in for? Do you need to let your boss know you’re leaving for the school year? Have you discussed with your employer if you will be returning for breaks? Are there any appointments you need to go to before school? Depending on how far away from home, it is sometimes easier to go to your yearly appointments during summer or winter breaks.

5. Enjoy the last few weeks of summer!

Ways to Make the Most Out of Your Internship

Erin Gardner | Lifestyle Section Editor | eg245916@ohio.edu

Summer is approaching, and internships are lining up. The Ohio University j-school requires students to complete an internship as a graduation obligation. Whether it’s paid or unpaid, the internship process can be foreign and lonely. FANGLE is here to help with the top 5 ways to make that summer internship count.

Socialize

It’s important to communicate with your colleagues and editors. Although it can seem appealing to pop in the headphones and go to town on the to-do list, it’s beneficial to make friends with fellow interns and employees. By creating daily conversation, you foster relationships with the office and develop your accountability and leadership skills. If you’re of-age, go grab drinks with your editor or the other interns. If there’s a company outing, show up and mingle because it can only benefit you.

Ask questions

Asking questions is not a sign of weakness; it demonstrates that you are passionate to learn and grow from your mistakes. Don’t be ashamed of not knowing policy or formatting. Employers will appreciate your eagerness and willingness to absorb information and better yourself.

Pay attention to AP

Depending on the company, AP style is crucial to the format. Knowing AP might be required, so it’s a smart idea to familiarize yourself with it. You can download the style guide here. For example, numbers one through nine are spelled out, 10 and higher are generally written out numerically. Dates are communicated numerically. August through February are abbreviated when used with numbered dates, while March through July are never abbreviated. Months without dates are not abbreviated. Also, spell out states when standing alone and abbreviate them after a city except Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Ohio, Texas and Utah. AP is extremely different than MLA and understanding the basics can go a long way.

Network

An internship is an excellent opportunity to brand and promote yourself as a possible employee to your authority. Having an updated resume and clean-looking business cards are smart ideas. Also, taking a look and cleaning up your social media profiles could benefit you in the long run. Employers can and will predetermine your professionalism and accountability toward the job.

Get shit done

Especially if the internship is unpaid, it is easy to feel that the work is busy work or mindless labor. However, it is important to realize that the internship could amount to a paid internship or an entry-level job. Commit yourself as a steadfast and passionate employee and only produce work that you are proud of.

FANGLE understands that the #adulting is hard but utilizing these tips can make internships easy.

And If You Needed Another HomePod Review…

Alex McEvoy | Society Staff Writer | am329413@ohio.edu

Sometimes it’s hard to determine while using the HomePod whether a feature is intentionally missing or is a victim of what seemed to be a hectic development schedule. That might be the key takeaway of the HomePod at the moment. Every feature is either absolutely perfect and impresses immediately or an embarrassing failure for Apple.

Continue reading And If You Needed Another HomePod Review…

Self-care for Activists

Destiniee Jaram | Society Staff Writer | dj395016@ohio.edu

The typical week for a college student is hectic. Between class, working, clubs and meetings, the extra duties of an activist are not easy. Chronic stress can manifest into unhealthy physical and emotional symptoms. Examples include feelings of worthlessness, poor digestion, excessive or a lack of sleep, eating problems, depression, muscle tension and exhaustion. At times, it feels like the world is a constant stream of negativity, thus it can be easy to forget self-care.

Continue reading Self-care for Activists