Category Archives: COLLEGE LIFE

Book Bucket-list: 10 Books To Read This Summer

Erin Gardner | Editor-in-Chief | eg245916@ohio.edu

Are you bored yet? FANGLE is here to help with 10 book recommendations to keep you busy this summer.

The Female Persuasion – Meg Wolitzer

Shy college freshman, Greer Kadetsky meets Faith Frank, a sixty-three-year-old trailblazer for the women’s movement. Greer is extremely infatuated with her boyfriend, Cory, but when she hears Faith talk about women’s rights, she feels something spark. Wolitzer reminds women and men alike that love isn’t everything. Bring this gem along on a beach day and be reminded that you’re a badass.

The Outsiders – S.E. Hinton

In this timeless novel, Hinton introduces Ponyboy Curtis, a greaser from the north side of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Pony’s brothers and friends depend on each other—they have to. The clash of social class teaches Pony that in the end the Greasers and the Socs aren’t that all different. Published in 1967, this cult classic is the perfect summer read when the summer blues are in full swing.

Sociable – Rebecca Harrington

Elinor Tomlinson, with a degree in journalism, moves to New York and hopes to marry her journalist-turned boyfriend while writing catchy and zingy opinion pieces. Her reality: she nannies for two toddlers and sleeps in an unkempt apartment. After landing a job at Journalism.ly, she learns she effectively writes shareable, relatable content and soon becomes popular. But with internet fame come its flames. This relevant read is a personal favorite of FANGLE.

Text Me When You Get Home – Kayleen Schaefer

Every woman knows this phrase—text me when you get home, get home safe, call me if you need me, love you. Schaefer, through interviews with historians, celebrities, authors and producers, reconstructs how we as society view friendships. Take this nugget for the book club with your girls (and guys).

Ohio – Stephen Markley

Although Markley’s novel is set to be released in August, the murder mystery is one to be watching. In a small Ohio town where there is only “war, recession, political gridlock, racial hostility, and a simmering fear of environmental calamity…where foreclosures, Walmarts, and opiates riddle the land, death rates for rural whites have skyrocketed, fueled by suicide, addiction and a rampant sense of marginalization and disillusionment,” the novel is scarily applicable. Four classmates, Bill Ashcraft, Stacey Moore, Dan Eaton and Tina Ross, reunite in the podunk town, each on an undertaking. Read this page-turner on a rainy day with a iced coffee in tow.

The Witch Doesn’t Burn in this One //and// The Princess Saves Herself in this One– Amanda Lovelace

Lovelace’s poems are packed full of raw emotion and feminine power. She makes a point of creating a list of trigger warning: child abuse, intimate partner abuse, sexual assault, eating disorders, trauma, death, murder, violence, fire, menstruation, transphobia & more. “remember

to practice self-care before, during, & after reading,” she writes. These poems are perfect reading material for practical self-care—you know shit that is actually helpful like taking medication and sleeping instead of face masks and guacamole dates.

Tangerine – Christine Mangan

Alice Shipley is startled and confused when she sees her ex-best friend from college, Lucy Mason. Soon after Lucky tries to pick where things left odd, Alice feels smothered by Lucy. Alice’s husband goes missing and shit hits the fan. If you’re feeling saucy, give this a read on a pool day.

Feel Free – Zadie Smith

The collection of essays is organized into five sections—In the World, In the Audience, In the Gallery, On the Bookshelf, and Feel Free. Smith tackles questions like what is the social network, why do we love libraries and what will we tell our granddaughters about our collective failure to address global warming? This think piece is the perfect read in a coffeeshop on a breezy day.

On the Road – Jack Kerouac

Writer, Sal Paradise joins Dean Moriarty, a recluse and rebel, on a road trip from New York to San Francisco to Mexico. With no real plot, the duo experiences America in its raw form. Coming from the beatnik era, Kerouac’s novel has very little punctuation and sentence structure, which could be symbolic of the chaotic and messy way of everyday life. Give this one a read when your room seems too small and your town seems too suburban.

Ways to Make the Most Out of Your Internship

Erin Gardner | Lifestyle Section Editor | eg245916@ohio.edu

Summer is approaching, and internships are lining up. The Ohio University j-school requires students to complete an internship as a graduation obligation. Whether it’s paid or unpaid, the internship process can be foreign and lonely. FANGLE is here to help with the top 5 ways to make that summer internship count.

Socialize

It’s important to communicate with your colleagues and editors. Although it can seem appealing to pop in the headphones and go to town on the to-do list, it’s beneficial to make friends with fellow interns and employees. By creating daily conversation, you foster relationships with the office and develop your accountability and leadership skills. If you’re of-age, go grab drinks with your editor or the other interns. If there’s a company outing, show up and mingle because it can only benefit you.

Ask questions

Asking questions is not a sign of weakness; it demonstrates that you are passionate to learn and grow from your mistakes. Don’t be ashamed of not knowing policy or formatting. Employers will appreciate your eagerness and willingness to absorb information and better yourself.

Pay attention to AP

Depending on the company, AP style is crucial to the format. Knowing AP might be required, so it’s a smart idea to familiarize yourself with it. You can download the style guide here. For example, numbers one through nine are spelled out, 10 and higher are generally written out numerically. Dates are communicated numerically. August through February are abbreviated when used with numbered dates, while March through July are never abbreviated. Months without dates are not abbreviated. Also, spell out states when standing alone and abbreviate them after a city except Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Ohio, Texas and Utah. AP is extremely different than MLA and understanding the basics can go a long way.

Network

An internship is an excellent opportunity to brand and promote yourself as a possible employee to your authority. Having an updated resume and clean-looking business cards are smart ideas. Also, taking a look and cleaning up your social media profiles could benefit you in the long run. Employers can and will predetermine your professionalism and accountability toward the job.

Get shit done

Especially if the internship is unpaid, it is easy to feel that the work is busy work or mindless labor. However, it is important to realize that the internship could amount to a paid internship or an entry-level job. Commit yourself as a steadfast and passionate employee and only produce work that you are proud of.

FANGLE understands that the #adulting is hard but utilizing these tips can make internships easy.

ScreenShop: What You Need to Know

Tarein Phillips | Culture Staff Writer | tp314215@ohio.edu

Technology keeps making the impossible possible – especially in the world of fashion. ScreenShop is an app in which the user can screenshot a desired outfit, upload it to the app and the app will then generate exact or similar pieces from the outfit.

FANGLE took an inside look at the ScreenShop app to find how it works, which are detailed in steps below.

Step 1: Screenshot a picture of an outfit you like from Instagram

Step 2: Upload the screenshot to the ScreenShop app  

 

Step 3: Allow yourself to be amazed

Once ScreenShop processes your screenshot and uploads it into its system, similar or even exact items from your picture will display and give you the option to buy it! And don’t worry, even if your funds may be depleted, ScreenShop gives you the option to ‘heart’ every item that you like and add it to your favorites to save for later.

You can also see other uploaded screenshots from around the world and decide if you want to ‘pass’ or ‘add’ the screenshot to your own selection.

ScreenShop is a great cool app to add to your home screen that will help to fulfill all the fashion needs your heart may desire.

Brazilian Waxes: A Walk-Through

Kailee Missler | Lifestyle Writer | km199116@ohio.edu

For those who don’t know, a Brazilian wax is a wax that takes off all the hair in your pubic and anal area. This sounds extremely scary, especially for people who have never experienced being open with their body around another human being. That’s not even including the pain they expect to come along with it.  This article will walk through the process of getting a Brazilian wax, what to expect, and is it worth it.

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Self-care for Activists

Destiniee Jaram | Society Staff Writer | dj395016@ohio.edu

The typical week for a college student is hectic. Between class, working, clubs and meetings, the extra duties of an activist are not easy. Chronic stress can manifest into unhealthy physical and emotional symptoms. Examples include feelings of worthlessness, poor digestion, excessive or a lack of sleep, eating problems, depression, muscle tension and exhaustion. At times, it feels like the world is a constant stream of negativity, thus it can be easy to forget self-care.

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From Student to Activist: School Shooting Culture

Lifestyle Staff Writer | Jamie Clarkson | jc063415@ohio.edu

We always say the same thing to ourselves. Sure, school shootings happen. But they would never happen to me. While violent attacks on college campuses are less prevalent, they cannot be ruled out. All students must face the possibility.

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Drop Your Shorts Film Festival

Erin Gardner | Lifestyle Section Editor | eg245916@ohio.edu

Yang Miller hosted the annual Drop Your Shorts Short Film Festival on February 25, 2018 at the Athena Cinema. The cinema explains that the purpose of the event is to celebrate “the talent of local and regional filmmakers. It gives participants the chance to see their original work on the big screen.” Contestants were encouraged to submit a film under 12 minutes about any topic of their choosing. The audience then voted on their favorite film and the winning film “will be shown prior to a regular run feature for one month.”

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